The Howard University researchers will continue to work on EPR with the goal of creating a machine that can produce higher-frequency microwave energy for quick and accurate results of various levels of radiation exposure. This sample is then analyzed with microwaves. Problem is, a dentist has to use dental tools to remove the enamel sample, and this isn’t practical in an emergency. A tiny bit of tooth can be removed without damaging the remaining tooth. The team is developing Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) to determine the level of free radicals in substances, including tooth enamel. The new technology is minimally-invasive and would provide data useful in treating people exposed to radiation in an accident or by a “dirty bomb,” which refers to a radiation dispersal device. A tiny bit of tooth can be removed without damaging the remaining tooth. The team is developing Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) to determine the level of free radicals in substances, including tooth enamel. The new technology is minimally-invasive and would provide data useful in treating people exposed to radiation in an accident or by a “dirty bomb,” which refers to a radiation dispersal device. The Howard University researchers will continue to work on EPR with the goal of creating a machine that can produce higher-frequency microwave energy for quick and accurate results of various levels of radiation exposure. SOURCE: LiveScienceResearchers at Howard University in Washington College of Dentistry believe that tooth enamel stores important data about a person’s exposure to radiation. SOURCE: LiveScience

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Original source : http://www.dentalblogs.com/archives/administrator/… The hope is that EPR can assist medical workers in triaging patients or dividing victims of radiation exposure into classes by the amount of radiation received. At present, EPR can be used to assess a person’s radiation exposure throughout life, which will provide data for other studies, such as radiation exposure’s influence on cancer risk. Free radicals absorb the waves and allow a trained professional to measure the amount of free radicals in the sample. Free radicals absorb the waves and allow a trained professional to measure the amount of free radicals in the sample. This sample is then analyzed with microwaves. Problem is, a dentist has to use dental tools to remove the enamel sample, and this isn’t practical in an emergency. Furthermore, EPR currently detects high levels of radiation, so samples from people with moderate or minimal exposure would not show an accurate reading. Teeth Show Evidence of Radiation Exposure
March 3rd, 2010 · 1 Comment

Researchers at Howard University in Washington College of Dentistry believe that tooth enamel stores important data about a person’s exposure to radiation. The hope is that EPR can assist medical workers in triaging patients or dividing victims of radiation exposure into classes by the amount of radiation received. What will this information be used for? At present, EPR can be used to assess a person’s radiation exposure throughout life, which will provide data for other studies, such as radiation exposure’s influence on cancer risk. Furthermore, EPR currently detects high levels of radiation, so samples from people with moderate or minimal exposure would not show an accurate reading. What will this information be used for?

Originally posted 2010-03-19 14:42:44. Republished by Blog Post Promoter